Pneumonia Immediately After Chemotherapy

Pneumonia immediately after chemotherapy, is too severe for a cancer patient. With the highly compromised immune system, the bacteria or virus takes control and infects the patient with severe symptoms of the disease. Till the blood tests confirm the type of bacteria or virus, the patient is treated with pain killers and heavy antibiotics.

Pneumonia  Chest X-Ray

Pnuemonia, Chest infection

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X-Ray shows slow recovery after treating with antibiotics

Severity of Fever and Cough

The patient will run high temperature as 103 °F with unbearable body pain. The cough will be too severe that you can find traces of blood in the sputum. Unless treated immediately, it will be fatal. The mental condition becomes worse as the patient starts hallucinating and moaning in pain. Even the strongest will start crying over the unbearable pain and discomfort.

Recovery

Most of the nurses enquire whether the patient has urinated if the fever does not subside. Once the patient flushes out the bacteria through urine, the fever breaks. That is the most miserable moment for the patient who lays helpless on the bed having mixed emotions about the disease and death.

Slow and Steady

The doctor will immediately stop the chemotherapy and put the patient on antibiotics and immunotherapy. The team will monitor the patient for any adverse effects through repeated blood tests and chest x-ray. It may take atleast ten days to recover and be ready for the next chemo dose.

Food and Cleanliness

You must be very careful with the food you cook for the patient. Any food that is boiled or steamed for atleast twenty minutes is advisable to avoid infection. Even fruits should be soaked and washed in hot water.

Love and Care

Not only the immune system is weak but also the self is broken and miserable. You must ensure that the patient is treated with love and utmost care since they feel insecured and behave like a child.

Published by Kavitha Patchamalai

I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. BY ROBERT FROST